Lonesome Dove – review

Lonesome Dove - Tommy Lee Jones as Capt Call

Lonesome Dove mini-series – Tommy Lee Jones as Capt Call

First impressions of Lonesome Dove are physical. Do I need to sort a gym membership to be able to carry it around with me? It weighs in at 843 pages; an intimidating brick for my fellow passengers on the 0810 to Birmingham that would have to be classed as luggage.

But within a few pages I was hooked. It’s a wonderful read and I had no fears about finishing it.  Unlike many long books I’ve read I soon forgot about the word count and began to dread the end.

In short, the book is a cattle drive, and indeed spiritual journey, from the badlands of Texas up to the pastures of Montana. Gus and Call are the main characters – tough ex-Texas Rangers leading a crew that ranges from experienced cowhands to wet-behind-the-ears but willing Irish immigrants. The West was brutal and many of the scenes have stayed with me: the nest of snakes in the Texas river, the brutal Indian Blue Duck slaying July Johnson’s followers, the abandoning of a baby.

There is every form of hardship imaginable, but it never feels too much. The humanity of the characters – whether it be Gus’s talkative nature and wit or Deet’s loyalty – shines through. When things go badly wrong it is because characters are tested by a harsh landscape or brutalised by others. Often it is naivety or lust or braggadocio, forgivable or without consequence in our world, that leads to the direst consequences.

A wonderful book. Recommended as a great Western.

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About richlakin

I'm married with two young boys and living in Staffordshire. If I'm not working you can find me day dreaming or holding high-brow literature in front of my face. Or eating Arctic Roll.
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One Response to Lonesome Dove – review

  1. beetleypete says:

    I well remember the mini-series, though I doubt that it did justice to such a tome. Still, I have never actually read a western, since ‘Destry rides Again’, in the early 1960’s. You make this one sound appealing though Rich.
    Regards from Norfolk, Pete.

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